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It's An All Out War for the U.S. Presidentiables as Super Tuesday Begins

Written By David D'Angelo on Tuesday, February 5, 2008 | 2/05/2008

In just a couple of hours the United States preparatory election phase for the Republican and Democratic Party will enter one of the most contested phase in their caucuses and primaries as they both hold the Super Tuesday event.

It will be neck and neck for Hilary Clinton and Barrack Obama who had quadrupled their political ad spending using high end and viewer rich television and ad space arenas like the Hollywood Channel and Super bowl. Barrack is closing up on California as the national poll between rival Hilary is now an statistical even.

Romney and McCain meanwhile are on a bitter teeth to teeth fight against each other. Each of them is throwing accusations and wrong positions in the past that they both say are unlikely for a Republican Candidate.

Meanwhile for two other Republican candidates, Ron Paul and Mike Huckabee, it will be their last ditch effort to stay in the rice. Good for Ron Paul because he might still be up as a presidentiable of an alternative party, the Libertarian.

Party rules were stacked against a Tuesday knockout for Democrats. All their primaries and caucuses were awarding delegates proportionately, so coming in second counted. In the Republican field, nine contests offered all delegates to the winner.

Among the most closely watched races:

California, where Obama made up ground against longtime poll leader Clinton, and Romney bid for an upset. McCain planned to campaign there Tuesday after a morning rally at Rockefeller Center in New York.

State election officials said at least 3 million Californians already had voted, via mail-in ballot, out of 5.5 million ballots issued. They predicted that about 1 million of the remaining ballots would be cast Tuesday. Mail-in ballots are the last to be counted, increasing the odds of protracted suspense in the West.

Missouri: A toss-up in both parties

New York: Clinton's territory as senator, but Illinois Sen. Obama didn't concede it.

New Jersey: Another state where the Democratic race tightened.

New Mexico, Arizona: Along with California, states with large Hispanic populations, which to date have favored Clinton.

Connecticut: A Democratic battleground.

Georgia: A three-way toss-up among McCain, Romney and Huckabee.

McCain was favored in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Delaware and his home state of Arizona, with 251 delegates combined. Romney hoped to counter with victories in Utah and West Virginia, as well as in a string of caucuses in Western and Midwestern states.

Reference: with excepts from Yahoo News

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