Home » , , , » US Elections Update: It's Now Obama vs Clinton as Edwards Drops Out of the Race

US Elections Update: It's Now Obama vs Clinton as Edwards Drops Out of the Race

Written By David D'Angelo on Thursday, January 31, 2008 | 1/31/2008

Sen. John Edwards had decided to finally drop out of the Democratic Presidential Nomination race after another poor showing in the Florida caucus where Hilary Clinton bag the victory.

After his withdrawal it is a one-on-one fight for the first black and first woman if ever to be President of the United States. Both of them claims to be the better candidate.

Obama strikes on Clinton by saying that voting for her is a step back into the past while his candidacy is a move into the future. A vote not only to unite the Democratic party but the American people.

Former President Jimmy Carter also praises Barrack Obama although he did not endorse him.

"I think that Obama will be almost automatically a healing factor in the animosity now and the distrust that relates to our country and its government," said Carter, 83, who was president from 1977-1981.

As Edwards movs out his supporters can either support Obama or Clinton. It was revealed in a poll that 4 out of 10 of his supporters prefer Clinton while about a quarter prefers Obama.

Edwards amassed 56 national convention delegates, most of whom will be free to support either Obama or Clinton.

As expected, Edwards said he was suspending his campaign rather than ending it, but aides said that was simply legal terminology so that he can continue to receive federal matching funds for his campaign donations.

In suspending his campaign — instead of terminating it — Edwards keeps all 26 delegates he won in the Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina contests. After he officially exits, 10 of those delegates will be dispersed to the other candidates, with Obama getting six and Clinton getting four. Under party rules, Edwards will maintain a say in naming the other 16 delegates.

Edwards had also collected endorsements from 30 superdelegates — mainly party and elected officials who automatically attend the convention and can support whomever they choose. Three superdelegates had already switched from Edwards to Obama before Edwards suspended his campaign.

In the overall race for the nomination, Clinton has 249 delegates and Obama has 181. A total of 2,025 delegates are needed to secure the Democratic nomination.

0 comments: