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Why Was Gov. Sarah Palin Chosen?

Written By David D'Angelo on Thursday, October 2, 2008 | 10/02/2008

When Republican Senator John McCain decided to wait for Democratic Presidential Candidate Barack Obama's choice for his Vice President, McCain was thinking of a strategy to overcome Obama's popularity. Then it came, Obama chose Joe Biden and rejected Sen. Hilary Rodham Clinton. Then after that McCain decided on who to chose as Vice President, Alaska Governor Sarah Palin. Was it a wise choice or was it just a tactical choice?

When Obama chose Biden and rejected Clinton as VP, he seems to have lost the support of the women's vote which has made Clinton's campaign energetic and at par with that of the democratic nominee. Thus, McCain thought that getting a hockey mom such as Gov. Sarah Palin would win those crowd and eventually catapult him to the United States Presidency.

But McCain miss one thing which is the major difference between Sarah Palin and Hilary Clinton. Clinton is eloquent, reads a lot and has a wide knowledge and expertise on issues while Sarah Palin maybe eloquent but has very little knowledge and expertise on various issues. It is true that Palin's experience as an executive officer will help her in doing her job but the absence of knowledge on various issues might be detrimental to the country in which she will be serving as VP.

Compared to Joe Biden, Sarah Palin will never equal Biden's expertise and capability to be a very effective Vice President especially in this current time when the United States is facing an almost economic meltdown.

The Palin choice sure helped McCain during the first few weeks after it was announced but the flame had already subsided and the Republicans are loosing ground. On three key swing states Obama had reached the 50% mark. These states includes Ohio, Florida and Pennsylvania. These states offer 68 of the 270 electoral votes needed to clinch the United States presidency. Latest polls shows Obama leading McCain in Florida 51 percent to 43 percent, in Ohio 50 percent to 42 percent and in Pennsylvania 54 percent to 39 percent.

Palin's own approval rating among republican dropped to 47 percent from 70 percent and from 41 percent to 25 percent among likely voters. The tactical choice seems not to be effective as McCain had planned it to be.


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